HERCULES GLOBULAR STAR CLUSTER, M13

The most famous "globular star cluster" is called M13, located in the summer constellation Hercules, below.

Figure 1.  Constellation Hercules (and Corona, on right). The location of M13 is shown in the next picture. [Nikon F3, 35 mm f/3.5, mounted to Meade LX-200 10-inch telescope for tracking and hand guiding adjustments, 5.7-minute exposure, Fujicolor Professional 400 NPH pushed to 800, 3200-foot site on East Camino Cielo, north of Santa Barbara, May 22, 11:18 PM, PST].

Figure 2.  Zoom factor of 2.8, showing part of the constellations Hercules and M13 inside a box.  M13 has a magnitude of 5.9 (the brightness of all its component stars).  The faintest stars visible in this photo are magnitude 10.0.  [2001.05.22, Nikon F3, 105mm f/4.5, 7.7-minute exposure, Fujicolor Professional 400 NPH pushed to 800, camera mounted to Meade LX-200 10-inch telescope for tracking and hand guiding adjustments; site altitude 3200 feet in mountains north of Santa Barbara].

Figure 3.  Zoom factor of 5, showing a region several times larger than the box in the previous figure.  [2001.04.24, 0040 PST, Nikon F3, 400mm f/5.6, 30-minute exposure, Fujicolor Superia 400, camera mounted to Meade LX-200 10-inch telescope for tracking and hand guiding adjustments; site altitude 200 feet, Santa Barbara].

Figure 4.  This is a 2.5 zoom factor "detail" of the previous image.  Distinct stars are readily apparent.  The The faintest stars visible in this photo are magnitude 14.0.

Figure 5.  Zoom factor of 3.3, using a black-and-white CCD imager with R, G and B filters.  The field of view is 27 x 18 'arc. [2002.04.21, SBIG ST-8E CCD imager and True Technologies color filter wheel attached to a Meade LX-200 10-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope; RGB exposures of 60, 60 and 120-seconds; Santa Barbara residence.]

Return to AstroPhotos page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This site opened:  July 9, 2000.  Last Update:  May 25, 2002